Good old Ike – he didn’t think anyone would take these guys seriously. He was wrong.

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MjAwWDIwMA==/z/PVMAAMXQ0pNRpPzs/$T2eC16R,!y0E9s2S6cbQBRpPzsNBgg~~60_35.JPG?set_id=8800004005As we approach the start of the GOP’s Annual Hunting Season To Capture and Kill Legislation (Social Security from the 1930’s, Medicare from the 1960’s, and those 21st Century obscenities, Bush’s Medicare Part D Rx plan, and Obama’s nose under the door of universal health care), I like to remember this guy. Here’s then-former President Dwight D. Eisenhower in a 1954 letter to his brother.

Now it is true that I believe this country is following a dangerous trend when it permits too great a degree of centralization of governmental functions. I oppose this–in some instances the fight is a rather desperate one. But to attain any success it is quite clear that the Federal government cannot avoid or escape responsibilities which the mass of the people firmly believe should be undertaken by it. The political processes of our country are such that if a rule of reason is not applied in this effort, we will lose everything–even to a possible and drastic change in the Constitution. This is what I mean by my constant insistence upon “moderation” in government. Should any political party attempt to abolish social security, unemployment insurance, and eliminate labor laws and farm programs, you would not hear of that party again in our political history. There is a tiny splinter group, of course, that believes you can do these things. Among them are H. L. Hunt (you possibly know his background), a few other Texas oil millionaires, and an occasional politician or business man from other areas.Their number is negligible and they are stupid.

 

12 responses to “Good old Ike – he didn’t think anyone would take these guys seriously. He was wrong.

  1. Yup. Eisenhower. That radical left wing pinko.

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    • No, not quite. He did set the stage for them though and developed leanings towards their philosophy though and, as such, deserve little praise by Americans…no no strong condemnation either…except the great damage his precious interstate highway system caused to the nation, damage we’re still dealing with- and paying for today.

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      • “developed leanings’ – interesting turn of phrase. WWII and age changed him – he was no longer the young officer who, on horseback with his regiment, chased the ‘bonus army’ off the Washington Mall – terrorizing thousands of vets protesting their government. He developed leanings against that sort of thing.

        That said, I’m with you on the Interstates – more harm than good. Those roads pretty much destroyed organic growth and small town America. But we had to be ready for war, always ready for war.

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        • It was more that he turned seriously into a “managed economy” sort and one that believed in the value of a centrally controlled nation, an odd position for man who supposedly was Stalin’s enemy. Then again, Ike may have ordered the assassination of the Free French Army leader to appease Stalin…

          But one thing, Moe. Huzzah! You’re one of the very few I’ve encountered who know why the interstate system was and what it did.

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    • Brat, I think by today’s standards, we could call Nixon a pinko. Ike was an outright Leninist!!!

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  2. Are you sure he was a Republican. And of no interest to anyone but me, I was born on his 50th birthday. Date? Anyone, anyone.

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  3. Good Get Moe!

    My have times HAVE Changed!

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  4. He can be forgiven for thinking the American public is smarter than they really are. I prefer to believe Barnum “a sucker born every minute” and Menken “nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public”. Democracy only works when there is an informed electorate and that has vanished. And to insure it stays that way, conservatives in Florida are fighting to kill the education standards backed by 46 states and Jeb Bush. We need to keep em’ stupid.

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