Tag Archives: Super Bowl

Sunday for the rest of us

 So it’s Superbowl Sunday – here at home, at CBS where the always excellent Sunday morning show still delights even if the usual audience departed to begin the marathon of  pre-game shows – and in Afghanistan, where Sunday morning may be indistinguishable from any other morning. And where today is the 123rd day of the tenth year of the war.   

I thought I was done for the night, but . . .

Dependable Renegade had this – first look at a Super Bowl ad.

Who wins the weekend?

Between the Super Bowl and Egypt, this is going to be a ‘news weekend’. So much going on . . . or as Jerry Lee would put it ‘Whole Lot of Shakin’ Goin’ On’.  (I’ve got a long book myself.)

This is not the Friday oldie by the way. Because it’s Thursday.

The requisite Super Bowl post

and still good designers can't find work. Go figure.

Actually, I don’t do Super Bowl posts. I don’t even do football posts. But thanks to Political Irony and Bill Maher’s New Rules, I have learned there’s an angle of interest to me, an entirely new angle on this ‘ball game’ business. I learned the freaky scary truth about the NFL . They’re commies! Run-for-the-frackin’-hills!

A week ago, I posted about a New Rules bit in which Maher compared baseball and football in terms of popularity and earnings. He pointed out that football – the clear winner  – is run on a ‘take from the rich, give to the poor’ model.  The NFL, he said “put all of it [television revenue] in a big commie pot and split it 32 ways [among the teams].

We learn more from Political Irony: Take the Green Bay Packers who have won more NFL championships than any other team. How do they do this? Do they pay their players more? No! In fact, they have the lowest median salary in the NFL. Do they represent a big city? No! Green Bay (population 100,000) is the smallest city to have a major league football team. Their games always fill their stadium (which can hold 70% of the entire city population) and they have a waiting list for season tickets that could more than fill another stadium just as large.

So how do they do it? Most people don’t realize this, but the Green Bay Packers are a non-profit community-owned organization. You can buy stock in them, but it does not pay dividends, and it never increases in value. It is a worthless investment, and yet they have 112,000 shareholders (more than the population of Green Bay).

Continue reading