Tag Archives: Sandy Hook

Security guard forgets gun in school bathroom

POSTED BY ORHAN

Hired to protect a Michigan school following the Sandy Hook shootings, the new security guard, a retired firearms instructor, walked out of the school bathroom leaving his gum behind:

Just days after calling its newly hired armed security guard “a tremendous asset to the safety of our students,” a Michigan school released a statement saying the retired firearms instructor had caused a “breach in security protocol” by leaving his handgun unattended in the school’s bathroom. […]

The school, which serves grades K through 8, insists that no students were in danger, and vowed to “continue to work on improving school security.”

But of course, we do want to arm our students, don’t we?

Security Officer Hired by School in Response to Sandy Hook Shooting Forgets to Take Handgun With Him When Exiting Student Restroom

Our childrenz is saved!!!

teacher gunsAnd safe! Between this and armed kindergarten teachers, we’ve got it covered!

BOGOTA, Colombia – A Colombian firm that makes bulletproof vests is now creating armored clothing for children. . . .

Previously, the company had only manufactured for adults.

“After the tragedy in Connecticut, we started getting emails from customers [all over the US] asking for protected (clothing) because they were afraid to take their kids to school,” Caballero said.

Products include child-sized armored vests, protective undershirts and backpacks with ballistic protection that can be used as shields. The products are designed for children ages 8-16 years old . . .

Caballero performed a test on a pink-and-yellow striped bulletproof backpack attached to a pale blue protective vest, firing a 9mm pistol and a machine gun to show it could withstand a barrage of bullets.

Nailed it. USA! USA! 

Pity the children

POSTED BY ORHAN

drone-childrenThe outpouring of grief over the Sandy Hook shootings continues. That one nation, if not the whole world, can express such pain and grief over the murders of these twenty children speaks to us of our innate human capacity for empathy and compassion.

Some pointed out the obvious almost as soon as it happened, but it didn’t seem right. After all, the horror of one act of brutality does not detract from the horror of another. To mourn the dreadful loss of one group of people takes nothing away from the suffering of another.

And yet the frenzy of national soul-searching continues unabated. So, amid the endless replays of interviews with sobbing parents, the minute cross-examination of media-sick residents, the near-nationwide outrage and demands that Something Must Be Done, can we pause to remember that hundreds of children have been murdered by US drones in Afghanistan and Pakistan?

And can we demand that here, too, Something Must Be Done?