Tag Archives: pet peeves

On Demand is really annoying me

1381719_10152397079184657_408001691_nOr maybe it’s the damn networks’ fault. Or Obama’s. Or Bush’s. (Hey, I’m going with Bush. That’s always easy.)

For about a year now, and increasingly, recorded shows cut off before the last-minute or two. So f**k me.

I always watch Jon Stewart the next morning while getting breakfast. And I have never seen his ‘Moment of Zen’ in its entirety. Never.

The TV Guide is at least honest about what’s coming . . . they list the real run time – for instance, 8:00 – 9:01.

Have these folk noticed that live streaming is biting at their tails? I’d say it’s a heck of a time to get your viewers angry.

Good Riddance to Daylight Savings Time

Have I mentioned lately that I hate/resent/dread Daylight Savings Time? Always have. Always will. And here in The Sunshine State it’s an especial torture when,  every summer, we take an hour away from the coolest part of the day and tack it on to the hottest part of the day.

indian_daylight savings timeSo thank you National Geographic for putting it out there.  First, the premise put forward in 1917 that DST would energy has little relevance 100 years later.

In their 2008 National Bureau of Economic Research study, the team found that lighting demand dropped, but the warmer hour of extra daylight tacked onto each evening led to more air-conditioning use, which canceled out the gains from reduced lighting and then some: Hoosiers paid higher electric bills than before DST, the study showed . . . During the 2000 Sydney Olympics, parts of Australia extended daylight saving time while others did not . . . the practice did indeed drop lighting and electricity use in the evenings—but that higher energy demands during darker mornings completely canceled out the evening gains. . .

“Everywhere there is air conditioning, our evidence suggests that daylight saving is a loser,” Wolff said.

And, oh yeah, gas.

“When you give Americans more light at the end of the day, they really do want to get out of the house. And they go to ballparks, or to the mall and other places, but they don’t walk there. Daylight saving reliably increases the amount of driving that Americans do, and gasoline consumption tracks up with daylight saving.”

Conventional wisdom is that DST was begun to help farmers. Not so. Farmers found it disruptive to livestock and crops.  Who else doesn’t like it?

  • Orthodox religions with traditional prayer schedules have long fought against DST
  • The TV industry hates it and fights it, and
  • Arizona thinks it’s stupid and does not participate.

 

Reprise of a pet peeve

Supermarket carts are too frackin’ big. Look around your local store and see how many carts are full. One in ten? Yesterday at my local, the Manager was near the entrance pretending to be glad to see the customers and pretending to be willing to hear their comments. He wasn’t getting much business, so I thought I’d make an inquiry; surely there’s no reason to clog the aisles with unnecessary oversized carts?

This would do fine

I asked why not two sizes of carts. He said we have carry baskets. I said yes you do, and they’re wonderful when I”m gathering a few lightweight things. Lightweight things. So why not two sizes of carts on wheels, I asked. And the man looked at me as though I’d asked him to undress and do an Irish jig.

There is, no doubt, some marketing study of human behavior that underlies the continuing use of the big cart, even as families have shrunk and households are increasingly composed of a single person.

I am sure they think we’ll be compelled to buy more and fill that basket. And I’m also pretty sure they’ve never done the two/three times a week supermarket shuffle.

Enough with the giant shopping carts. (I’ve posted about this before, but no one listened.)

Another of Moe’s pet peeves

This is the second time I’ve posted a pet peeve and it is once again about language. I was just listening to CNN – something I usually avoid as I do all morning TV – and they were reporting a story about police getting ready to blow up a residence that was full of bombs. The reader reported that “they’ll blow up this home . . . ” Ouch.

When I grew up and for the centuries before then, a building where families or single people resided  (or even intended for that purpose) was a ‘house’ . In it, said people made a ‘home’. We understood ‘home’ to be pretty much where Mommy and Daddy lived – in thier house.

In the 1980’s, as residential real estate agents moved from being service providers to being masters of the universe, ‘home’ became the more marketable concept. It especially had cachet for those who’d never owned a house before.

And so today, one word has completely replaced the other and – I believe – lost meaning in the process; it’s become cheap. ‘Home’ is no longer ‘where the heart is’; it’s just  a building. Usually for sale.