Category Archives: social media

The Twitter and the ‘Twixt and the ‘Tween

Any reader of this blog knows of my fondness for comparing the financial and circulation differences between big name liberal and conservative publications. Previous entries (here and here) have compared only print publications. So how about the some presence on social media? Let us look at The Twitter and see who’s got the followers.

To begin, the big boys:

  • The New York Times – 8,207,190 followers
  • The Wall Street Journal – 2,730, 128 followers
  • The Washington Times (just for the fun of it) – 70,187 (Remember that one next time it’s used as a source on radio or tv.)

Okay, how about some individuals who dispense wisdom financial and economic?

  • Rick Santelli (patron saint of the Tea Party) – 13,958
  • Paul Krugman – 1,003,471
  • Larry Kudlow – 58,592

What about cable teevee’s 9:00 p.m. stars?

  • Sean Hannity – 668,302
  • Rachel Maddow – 2,568,204

And a few miscellaneous big names:

  • Michelle Malkin – 508,521
  • Michael Moore – 1,521, 596
  • Rush Limbaugh – 356,322
  • Matt Drudge – 184,243 (fading in fame?)
  • Bill O’Reilly – 364,663

Who has followers in the millions? Same story as with print media.

Ladies, how about this?

We can’t all whip out clever youtube videos, so how about painting the town in bras? Get your old bras, buy a bunch more at Goodwill . . .then drop those babies around town, drape them on parking meters, mailboxes, doorknobs on government offices, Republican HQ (let’s double down on that one) churches (certain ones anyway) . . . Picture it: bras everywhere!!! We could make it rain bras! It would bring our American Taliban to their knees, I tell you . . . to their knees! (pssssttt, tell your facebook friends to do it too.)

Yeah,, but did you know . . .

Upworthy is a new shared site. I really don’t know how it works, but I like it a lot. The stuff that pops up there takes a bit of a sideways look at “content that is as fun to share as a FAIL video of some idiot surfing off his roof.”

But, they add:

. . . we believe the things that matter in the world don’t have to be boring and guilt-inducing. And the addictive stuff we love doesn’t have to be completely without substance.

Here’s something important from over there that’s rarely  mentioned outside the usual wonky sites. Nice to see it somewhere younger people might visit:

We already know that 90 percent of the media is controlled by six companies, 37 banks have been consolidated into four, 307 types of corn have been reduced to 12, and these 10 companies own practically everything else. What’s next?

Subscribe. It’s fun.

One problem solved: It’s okay to be Takei. But what does one say in Virginia now that ‘climate change’ is banned?

This is a sea change . . . kids don’t want to drive

Really. Tale a look at this chart from Ad Age.  Apparently the trend is common knowledge in the auto, advertising and marketing industries. And probably quite a few others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No one is quite sure why, although young people themselves cite environmental concerns.  And since it’s a 30-year trend, it’s probably not because of unemployment or gas prices.

One theory – and the one that fascinates me – is that things like Skype and Facebook have given younger generations a new way to be together, without actually ‘being together.’

Gingrich joins cast of The Office

(I should really get off my current obsession with Gingrich, but dear Elvis, there’s just so much out there!)

Ever seen that eternal TV sitcom The Office? Of course you have. And you are therefore familiar with the loathsome character Dwight Schrute, played by the definitely not loathsome Rainn Wilson, who tweets.

Here are his most recent gravatars on Twitter. Do you see it? Do you see it?

I’m “going black” Wednesday

This site, along with hundreds of thousands of sites around the world (millions of sites?), will ‘go black’ at 8:00 a.m. today – and stay down for 12 hours – to protest the proposed U.S. legislation (SOPA/PIPA), which poses a real threat to a free internet and to freedom of speech on the internet. It’s being supported by and lobbied for by some of the world’s largest multinationals, who will benefit financially.

The SOPA legislation purports to provide protection for intellectual property, but is in fact toxic and dangerous. Watch the video here. You can sign the petition here.

See you back here after 8:00 pm tonight.

How did I miss this? But of course!

 

 

Sarah Palin has tweeted only six times in October

Three of them were cross promotions for her movie/book deal at WalMart.  Not too long ago her every tweet was breaking news – and there were oh, so many.

Now it’s time ro join the ‘What Ever Happened To . . . ‘ gang.

Real Americans

POSTED BY ORHAN

There are now over 130 #Occupying groups nationally. There’s a site to find one nearby or start your own.

I went to Zuccotti Park yesterday afternoon. The energy was different than a demonstration–the people were, well, occupying, not marching. The group was predominantly young, but people of all ages were participating. The area was mobbed with tourists, media (but not MSM), people who work in the area, some jeering, others curious or obviously sympathetic. My sense is that the energy changes from hour to hour.

There were lots of small groups, people working out tactics and strategy; if there’s anything like an organizational focus, the General Assembly is it; the emphasis is on leaderlessness, non-hierarchy, non-violence, consensus-building, giving everyone a voice.

There was a fairly heavy police presence, but the cops appeared laid back; they’re also learning–nothing energizes people like seeing college kids penned and pepper-sprayed.

Right now the people need sleeping bags, blankets, boots, food.

Gimme that old time religion, er, I mean protestin’!

This is what Occupy Wall Street is about. And now that major news outlets have deigned to take notice, it’s growing into a movement.  Invitations to local demonstrations are popping up all over Facebook (I’ve had two invitations just this morning) and this has generated an organizing site here. It gets personal at We Are the 99 Percent.  From there:

UPDATE: Here’s the official site for Occupy Wall Street. And I just found another picture I rather fancy.

Netroots Nation, the liberal media and who’s making the money buddy?

Markos Moulitsas

The Netroots Nation convention (referenced below) was so named by readers of Markos Moulitsas‘ blog, Daily Kos, probably the most influential liberal site in the blogsphere. It’s routinely demonized by the right who have dubbed it – and by extension Markos – The Great Orange Satan (the logo color is orange). Kos has gone from a a lone blogger  – immigrant, veteran, lawyer, author, father, political activist -whose very first sentence in his first blog post (in ’04 I think) was “I am a liberal”, to a community of tens of thousands of activists,  hundred and hundreds of writers and advertising rates that would make The New York Times blush.

I’ve written often – here, and here, and here – about the utter failure of the liberal punditocracy and elected Democrats to make the point that liberal media dominates because it’s what people want and support with their dollars.

A blog is media. Daily Kos is a blog. Daily Kos is liberal and Daily Kos is making money. Lots of money.

It’s more successful than its conservative rivals (except perhaps  The Druge Report which even after a decade plus is still only a primitive blog acting as a news aggregator with a point of view). In any free market the major players are the ones that rake in the bucks because people value the product and pay for it. The media may be liberal, but what’s almost never mentioned is that it’s also   what America reads and watches. And pays for.

Let’s look at movies and compare the box office success of  the  anti-liberal movie Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged with Sicko, Michael Moore’s liberal documentary. Both of these were in limited release.

Atlas Shrugged:  Here’s a report from the Hollywood Reporter:

The man who says he spent $10 million of his own money to bring Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 to the big screen vowed Wednesday to go through with his plans to make the next two installments, even though critics hate the movie and business at movie theaters has fallen off a cliff.

[Producer] Aglialoro said he had to scale down his ambition for the film to be in 1,000 theaters this weekend, so it will likely be closer to 400. During its opening weekend, the movie took in $5,640 per screen but then only $1,890 in its second. Through Wednesday, the film had grossed $3.3 million since opening April 15.

That paper also covered Sicko when it was released in ’07. here

Lionsgate far outpaced the competition this summer, but its biggest hit was the Weinstein Co. co-release “Sicko.” Michael Moore’s harsh and humorous health-care expose took in $24.1 million. Currently neck and neck with “An Inconvenient Truth,” it will pass that film to become the third-highest-grossing nonmusical documentary of all time this weekend, though its purse doesn’t begin to compare with the top-ranking docu, Moore’s “Fahrenheit 9/11” ($119.2 million.)

Liberal media has more reach. Because people pay for it. From an earlier post, I’ll republish this, because it can’t be posted often enough.

FROM Whatever Works in FEBRUARY of 2010 :

That most frequent target of conservative media, The New York Times, reported a circulation (March 2009) of 1,039,031 copies on weekdays and 1,451,233 copies on Sundays. And the venerable Wall Street Journal has equivalent if not higher weekday numbers. But since the Times is perceived to be ‘liberal’ throughout and the Journal is perceived to be conservative only in its editorial pages, they’re not politically opposite. The Journal is a hybrid. So a comparison would not be useful.)

NEWSPAPERS
The Washington Post – A publicly traded company
Daily audience 1,599,900

The Washington Times – A privately held company owned by the Rev. Sun Young Moon
Daily audience 83,511

MAGAZINES
The Weekly Standard – a privately held company
Can’t find circulation numbers, even at their own website, so to keep it fair(ish)
National Review – a privately held company
Weekly circulation 183,000

Time Magazine – A publicly traded company
Weekly circulation 3,400,000

I draw the reader’s attention to which of these publications thrive in the free market and which are rich men’s hobbies.

Balloon Juice Day here at Whatever Works

For those amongst you who aren’t savvy to the ways of the netroots, John Cole (again) put up a post this morning asking for funds to send a Balloon Juice contributor to Netroots Nation, the huge annual convention of lefty bloggers, politicians and other media types. But mostly bloggers.

So Cole wants to send someone and posts a ‘bleg’ (i.e., to beg on a blog) for financial support to make it happen. Here’s how it goes:

Hello all- we are going to hold a brief, brief fundraiser this morning to pay for Kay to hit Netroots Nation . . . This isn’t too expensive a trip:

Hotel expenses are 390- $130 a night.
Air fare is 450.
I figure 300 for expenses, food, and other things.
And then another 300 for registration. All in all, we are shooting for about 1440. So if you are interested in helping pay for the BJ rep, hit the paypal link.

UPDATE:  At $750 at 11 am. Almost halfway.

UPDATE: STOP. We are at $1600. No more donations needed unless you want them spent on liquor and cat treats.

It took an hour. Lucky Kay.

Seen here some of the young bloggers of the left at  the first Netroots Nation, including Cenk  Uygur and Sam Seder who have both moved into traditional media.

Beirut Roxx

POSTED BY ORHAN

“Whilst the idea of a flash mob isn’t a new thing, a Dabke / Hip-Hop flash mob in Beirut Rafic Hariri International Airport (Beirut Duty Free) at a time when the region is in flux is certainly a first.

On March 5th, 2011, passengers experienced something a little different. A flash mob performed a mix of Dabke and hip-hop to entertain and delight passengers and airport staff alike.”

Dabke is the most popular Arab folk dance in Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria.

Something new?

Watch yer language citizen!

There were a few protest demonstrations in Tehran today – maybe the orange Green Revolution of last year 2009 has life in it yet. What I saw reported today had an aspect I don’t remember from last year. Yesterday, people in the streets were  calling  for the ouster of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei.  I’ve no idea whether that’s because they don’t want to be an Islamic state or if they just want jobs. Either way, calling out Ayatollahs so disrespectfully in public feels new.

UPDATE: Iran is heating up. Just heard that the State Department has established Twitter feeds and Facebook pages in both Arabic and Farsi to broadcast support to the demonstrators.