Let’s remember more than the fallen . . .

image006 (2)Today is the 240th day of the twelfth year of the US war in Afghanistan. So as we approach 13 years there, and pass the 11th year of the Iraq occupation, let’s tune out those who would call a President who moves to extricate us a ‘traitor’. Instead, let’s remember Korea and Vietnam and the lessons we failed to learn from those two hapless interventions.

Afghanistan is already slipping back into its territorial and tribal fights and Iraq is facing increasing sectarian conflict reminiscent of the Sunni/Shia ‘civil war’ of 2005-06.

My hope for today is that those who call for more war will find no ears to hear. Let them shout into the wind.

8 responses to “Let’s remember more than the fallen . . .

  1. Well said!

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  2. I hope you’re right, Moe, but I fear you aren’t. There’s nobody who likes “the smell of napalm in the morning” better than those who don’t have to go and actually smell it! 😦

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  3. And then there are those like John McCain that went and still beat the drum. He is in Syria now, which is seriously scary.

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    • Imagine Elyse if we did what he and the rest of the war mongers want? They talk about ‘no fly’ zones. Dear Elvis, no fly zones?!!! Just what does he think we would we do the first time Assad shot down an American plane and took the pilot?

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  4. I’d say at least 50% of our wars since the big one have been mistakes.

    I’m assuming Korea and the first gulf war couldn’t have been avoided without continued aggression against US interests the Soviets and Sadam.

    Vietnam and the Second Gulf war seem like pretty clear losers to me.

    As you’ve said Mo: we go to war a lot. On days like Memorial day maybe we should endeavor to change that.

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    • bruce, from the “us wars” entry in Wikipedia, take a look at how they’ve had to organize our discrete military actions by categorizing them by decades because there are HUNDREDS of them. Not all are full wars, but all are discrete military actions, distinct from each other and often ‘named’.. This list is just from 2010 to the present, less than 4 full years:

      2010-11 War in Iraq. Operation New Dawn. On February 17, 2010, U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates announced that as of September 1, 2010, the name “Operation Iraqi Freedom” would be replaced by “Operation New Dawn”. This coincides with the reduction of American troops to 50,000.
      2011 – Libya. Operation Odyssey Dawn. Coalition forces enforcing U.N. Security Council Resolution 1973 with bombings of Libyan forces.
      2011 – War on Terrorism. Osama Bin Laden is killed by U.S. military forces in Pakistan as part of Operation Neptune Spear.
      2011 – Drone strikes on al-Shabab militants begin in Somalia.[15] This marks the 6th nation in which such strikes have been carried out, including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Yemen and Libya.[citation needed]
      2011 – Uganda. US Combat troops sent in as advisers to Uganda.[16]
      2012 – Jordan. 150 US troops deployed to Jordan to help it contain the Syrian Civil War within Syria’s borders.
      2012 – Turkey. 400 troops and two batteries of Patriot missiles sent to Turkey to prevent any missile strikes from Syria.
      2012 – Chad. 50 U.S. troops have deployed to the African country of Chad to help evacuate U.S. citizens and embassy personnel from the neighboring Central African Republic’s capital of Bangui in the face of rebel advances toward the city.
      2013 – Mali. US forces assisted the French in Operation Serval with air refueling and transport aircraft.
      2013 – Somalia. US Air Force planes supported the French in the Bulo Marer hostage rescue attempt. However, they did not use any weapons.

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