How a nation commits suicide at the checkout

If these guys are sharing the occasional cocktail with Monsanto we’re cooked . . . from The Grist, here:
walmart

21 responses to “How a nation commits suicide at the checkout

  1. I sometimes think of all the stores, that have closed up, because of the likes of Walmart, Target, etc. So not only are we cooked, but fucked big time, with no end in sight.

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  2. Good Morning Moe!

    I’m totally stealing the infographic for my blog. 🙂

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  3. Wow. I guess my boyfriend is right to shop at the local co-op, even if it’s a little more expensive.

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    • Recently I went to a Walmart in a desperate attempt to find something – I bought the single item and that was that. I shop local! (well, except for Amazon . . .)

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      • Well, I should explain that I don’t shop at Walmart 😉 I don’t even think there is one in my area. However, perhaps I should try to make my shopping even more local and sustainable…hmmm.

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  4. This is crap, Moe, and you know it. WalMart is much cheaper for real groceries than the local equivalents. Hence, it would actually benefit the average and less than average households to buy their groceries there…if they actually cooked real food instead of buying and heating preprocessed crapola.

    And farmers markets and such? Don’t make me laugh! Those are the bailiwick of the niche grower and are normally expensive as all hell. *smirk* I know, I shop at one on an almost weekly basis…but I’m one of those evil 2%’ers and can afford to indulge my tastes for locally grown and heritage produce.

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    • You make a false argument jonolan when you say “it would actually benefit the average and less than average households to buy their groceries there”. that assumes that the cost of groceries is the single measure of what benefits the average household.

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      • I would say that, given the normative food choices of the average and less than average households, cost is the primary metric when it comes to groceries.

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        • Well if that’s the case, we don’t want to be encourage opportunities for them to fill their tummies 😆

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          • I’m not into forcing healthy behavior on people, and I’m not that into limiting the poor’s access to food either, and I’m very much against having to pay for their food when it’s priced over their perceived limits.

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            • I’m not into forcing individual behavior either,, but I’m fine with coming down on those who bring bad htings to the ‘commons’ – like those who pollute our air and water and those who wreak economic destruction on small businesses and town.

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              • And you support Obama?!?!? The policies that he endorses and shills for will most certainly wreak economic destruction on small businesses and town in the course of “reigning in” the big businesses.

                But hey! I don’t like Walmart either – for a variety of reasons, many the same as your own, but I also understand that I as one of those “evil 2%’ers,” can afford that luxury whereas many cannot without dramatically lessening their perceived lifestyles and furthering the idea of a separation of classes. Hence, I don’t particularly attack Walmart or the other big box retailers.

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                • What policies are you referring to? Regulations? Taxes?

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                • The list is too long to enumerate – and it covers crap from the last 6 – 7 administrations – but here’s some random highlights of all three:

                  Forcing banks to give a certain % of loans to unworthy borrowers
                  Enducing the same banks to create and invest in mortgage-back securities
                  Trying to tax capital gains as normal income
                  ObamaCare
                  The payroll tax holiday and related manipulations of same
                  Forcing SSI to invest solely in the gov.’s deficit
                  All or most of the strings attached to fed “aid” to the several states’ programs such as: education, road maintenance, and entitlement programs

                  The list could go on for miles of screen real estate, Moe, and still not touch on what I feel is the biggest problem.

                  That problem is that far, far, too many rules and regulations coming out of DC are methodology oriented as opposed to results orients. They don’t set targets; they demand that those targets are met in certain, specific manners – e.g., they don’t tell power plants that they must meet specific emission goals, they demand that they install specific devices in order to do so.

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                • ” methodology oriented as opposed to results orients.” – on that I’ll agree to some extent. Maybe to a large extent – emissions stanards are also best acheived by measuirng outcomes. We do it with MPH – setting the number, not the method.

                  And it’s one of the reasons I like Obamacare – results oriented incentives and penalties are built in, unlike our out of control fee for service system.

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  5. The quality of Walmart meat is atrocious. I’m fortunate enough to live in an area with plenty of decent grocery stores, so I don’t buy any groceries at Walmart. Ever.

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  6. I thought that when grocery prices were rising and workers wages were falling it was always the fault of the guy in the White House . Damn, I see I have fallen 4 years behind the times, again . I forgot we are living in a new era .

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