Say hello to America’s debtors’ prisons. The 19th century is all the fashion, bitches!

Did you know about this? I didn’t. (Charles Dickens however was very familiar with this particular script.)

Here’s the story at Naked Capitalism from 2010. It’s not only still going on, it’s far worse today. And in the new American way, we’ve invited private companies to handle the matter, with enough profits to – ahem – make a few campaign contributions to their favorite pols. It’s a whole new growth industry. (Because Elvis-forbid that States should add public sector jobs! If it’s jobbed out, and thus off the State payroll, and even though it’s more costly (in more ways than one), our elected officials then can’t be accused of adding government jobs when they run for re-election. Sweet.

The practice is spreading because it’s such a good economic model – spend State money to imprison debtors, then close them off from any avenue by which they could repay that debt. And in most cases, add a few fees and let them compound. Brilliant, yes?  And it’s so rightous. And godly.

Here’s a  CBS News story from April of this year: 

How did breast cancer survivor Lisa Lindsay end up behind bars? She didn’t pay a medical bill — one the Herrin, Ill., teaching assistant was told she didn’t owe. “She got a $280 medical bill in error and was told she didn’t have to pay it,” The Associated Press reports. “But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs.”

Although the U.S. abolished debtors’ prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to haul people in who don’t pay all manner of debts, from bills for health care services to credit card and auto loans. In parts of Illinois, debt collectors commonly use publicly funded courts, sheriff’s deputies, and country jails to pressure people who owe even small amounts to pay up, according to the AP.

I especially liked this part:

Some states also apply “poverty penalties,” including late fees, payment plan fees, and interest when people are unable to pay all their debts at once, according to a report by the New York University’s Brennan Center for Justice. Alabama charges a 30 percent collection fee, for instance, while Florida allows private debt collectors to add a 40 percent surcharge on the original debt. Some Florida counties also use so-called collection courts, where debtors can be jailed but have no right to a public defender.

8 responses to “Say hello to America’s debtors’ prisons. The 19th century is all the fashion, bitches!

  1. Next up — Witch Trials. News at 11.

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  2. Since the people can’t their bills….
    Who pays for them when the state has them?

    Like

  3. Anon is me Jamesb@Politicaldog101…..
    Hey Moe I’ve been dropped from your blogroll…

    You mad at me?

    Six states (Arkansas, Arizona, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, and Washington) allow debt collectors to seek arrest warrants for debtors in default if all other collection methods have failed. Whether a debtor will actually be prosecuted or not varies from state to state, county to county, and town to town. The individual is taken into custody and is typically required to submit financial documentation to the courts (to facilitate seizure of assets or wage garnishment), although in some cases the individual may be held indefinitely until a payment plan is reached or the debt is paid in full, especially if the individual is insolvent…
    wiki….
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debtors'_prison

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    • Mad at you? NO WAY! I haven’t dropped you, you’ve always been listed as ‘james at politicaldog 101’. Maybe I shoould just move it to Poliitical Dog? And how come you keep showing up as annonymous?

      Mad at you? NEVER 😆

      Like

  4. Pingback: Say hello to America's debtors' prisons. The 19th century is all the … | Medical Debt Collections

  5. I think it has to do with cookies…

    Every couple of days I clean some of them out….
    I may her done something there…

    and you can leave me where I am….
    no problem…
    I’ll have to keep showing ID…

    jamesb

    Like

  6. shortbus-wookie

    Hi Moe,

    Here is the ‘very brief’ about debtor’s prison from Huffington Post.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/22/debtors-prison-legal-in-more-than-one-third-of-us-states_n_1107524.html

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