Tag Archives: religious right

As watertiger put it, grifters gotta grift

Here again cometh Christian pin-up Ralph Reed and this time with More-Deity-For-Your-Dollars! He had to shut down that Indian Tribe swindle he had going – and damn but that was good money! Former partner Jack Abramoff went and changed careers after getting himself convicted and sent to jail. Jack’s into redemption now, so Ralph is back to plain old huckstering, an ancient, if dishonorable, profession. (See those annoying little points on the pocket handkerchief? There’s yer proof that Ralph’s the too too smooth sort.)

Does make me wonder where is Tom DeLay these days?

I’d say she got the ‘modestly dressed’ part just pitch-perfect

Who wouldn’t want to rush home to this little lady? Anyone? Anyone? Come on guys, look at that resume! Jeeez.

BOljqmWCMAAVeAf

We luvz science! Science iz fun!!!

Paul Ryan, when asked about jailing women for having an abortion, said “If it’s illegal, it’s illegal.”

To put these fools in office, millions of my fellow Americans voted for them. And they write laws.

Goldwater on the religious right (hint: he didn’t like them)

I kind of wish Barry Goldwater were still around:

Mark my word, if and when these preachers get control of the [Republican] party, and they’re sure trying to do so, it’s going to be a terrible damn problem. Frankly, these people frighten me. Politics and governing demand compromise. But these Christians believe they are acting in the name of God, so they can’t and won’t compromise. I know, I’ve tried to deal with them.

When you say “radical right” today, I think of these moneymaking ventures by fellows like Pat Robertson and others who are trying to take the Republican Party away from the Republican Party, and make a religious organization out of it. If that ever happens, kiss politics goodbye.

The big thing is to make this country, along with every other country in the world with a few exceptions, quit discriminating against people just because they’re gay. You don’t have to agree with it, but they have a constitutional right to be gay. And that’s what brings me into it.

Having spent 37 years of my life in the military as a reservist, and never having met a gay in all of that time, and never having even talked about it in all those years, I just thought, why the hell shouldn’t they serve? They’re American citizens. As long as they’re not doing things that are harmful to anyone else… So I came out for it.

I’m frankly sick and tired of the political preachers across this country telling me as a citizen that if I want to be a moral person, I must believe in “A,” “B,” “C” and “D.” Just who do they think they are? And from where do they presume to claim the right to dictate their moral beliefs to me? And I am even more angry as a legislator who must endure the threats of every religious group who thinks it has some God-granted right to control my vote on every roll call in the Senate. I am warning them today: I will fight them every step of the way if they try to dictate their moral convictions to all Americans in the name of “conservatism.”

God doesn’t hate just fags; seems he hates Steve Jobs too

That old Westboro Baptist Church gang are so amusing! But I do think it’s time we  start frisking them. And Margie? Whatcha wanna bet that middle name is Jesus?

 

Let’s not pretend anything else. With them it’s always about teh sex

Conservative Christians recoil at anything that touches – no matter how peripherally - on the assumption that females will someday have sex, and that’s only okay when making more little Christians. (Certainly, it’s never okay if the gals dare to enjoy teh sex.)

That, not government overreach, is at the core of the kefuffle over the HPV virus vaccine. That is what it’s really about. That is what it’s always about.

Let us note that Bachmann, who started the silly argument, is an evangelical Dominionist Christian. Those folks aren’t big on women’s rights.

Anybody know a way to send these guys back to the 19th century?

Once again, my state makes me proud.

According to a link-I’ve-lost (it may have been somewhere at Think Progress):

Thousands of unmarried couples who are living together in Florida may be surprised to learn that they are actually breaking the law. Under outdated and rarely enforced state laws that have been on the books since the late 1800s, “cohabitation” is actually a second-degree misdemeanor, punishable by $500 or up to 60 days in jail. The same penalty applies to adultery – which one Florida woman tried to have enforced for her cheating husband in 2006.

The Sun Sentinel reports that one Florida Republican is commendably trying to repeal these irrelevant laws — only to be met with mass opposition from his fellow Republicans including Gov. Rick Scott (R).

David Barton belongs in a tent in Tennessee in 1911. But he’s a right wing fav instead just like ‘Pastor’ John Hagee who says the Catholic Church is the anti-Christ. Oh I could go on . . . I do go on. And on.

(Oy. This post got away from me. It’s long and should probably be two posts. But do check out the photo below.)

Did you know Newt Gingrich is a fan of David Barton? Barton is the ‘historian’ made famous by Glenn Beck on his FOX show, and who’s now all the rage in conservative christian circles. If I ever see the likes of Romney with this guy, I may start believing that the End Times really are near. Whoops!  Too late. Already happened. Grab your children near . . .

Mother Jones tells us a bit about Barton today (h/t Kay at The Fifth Column). Juicylicious video there where he says things like :

BARTON: The Founders did not support slavery or engage in the practice.

Really? Washington, Jefferson, Madison were not the only slaveholders, but they were among the largest - owning hundreds of slaves each.

BARTON: The US fought the Revolutionary War because the Founders rejected the British Empire’s endorsement of slavery.

Really? The Founders were afraid or unable to deal with slavery when writing the US Constitution. They decided to let future generations deal with it.

BARTON:  the Founding Fathers “already had the entire debate on creation and evolution,” and sided with Creationism.

Really? The theory of evolution was presented in Charles Darwin’s seminal volume, The Origin of Species. It was published in 1859.

This is genuinely crazy stuff and should be laughed out a fourth grade classroom. It would have been 30 years ago.

But Barton is not a one-off just doing his thing on Beck’s show. He is a name in  the Christian Reconstructionism wing of the Republican Party. And there are a lot of them. The photo below was taken at Ralph Reed’s most recent  gimme-your-money-suckers event put together for the rubes by his Faith & Freedom Coalition (they use the ampersand in the logo see, cuz it’s more logoish). Feast your eyes upon those who would lead America into a new 18th century.

Christianists and profiteers together again

 Richard Lee – author of the American Patriots Bible, something the Twelve Apostles meant to get published but just didn’t get around to it.
Ralph Reed - first rate con man coordinated scam on Indian tribes with Jack Abrahmoff. Made them both rich.
Glenn Beck - Mormon. Megalomaniac. Got rich demagoging (seems to work every time).
Pastor John Hagee – Evangelical, preaches that the Catholic Church is the “whore of Babylon” as found in the Book of Revelations. McCain was ‘grateful’ for his support in ’08.
David Barton – da man
Jim Garlow – says gay marriage will lead to enslavement of Christians. Honest.
Tom Mullins - leader of Christ Fellowship church with a gajillion parishioners or whatever. Not crazy best I can tell.
Robert Georgeled boycott of this years’ RNC convention cuz they allowed gay Republicans to attend or something.
 
 

The Democrats’ 60′s legacy: will that become the Republicans’ 00′s legacy?

The Democratic Party is still trying to shake association with the student demonstrators, war protestors, flower children and the more radical leftists of the late 60′s and early 70′s. That ‘commie, hippie’ label comes from that long ago time – from events of 40 years ago.

I look at the Republican party today and wonder if they’ll pay a similar price for  embracing the Tea Party, the birthers, the creationists and the rancid religious right. Could this be their 60′s? I wonder if indeed they’ll pay a price – and for how long.

In fact, I wonder if they’ll survive the 2012 elections. If the conservative electorate is splintered enough, Democrats could get to pick up the pieces at all levels.

Because Jesus loves him

 Foreign Policy asks:
Why does James Inhofe support Ivory Coast’s Gbagbo?

(Laurent Gbagbo is the Ivory Coast dictator who’s refused to step down after an internationally monitored democratic election voted him out of office. James Inhofe is the senior United States Senator from Oklahoma.)

Most nations in the world as well as the UN have recognized Gbagbo’s rival as the rightful president of Ivory Coast. There has been terrible violence in that country since the election and it’s apparently okay with Ggagbo because his ego must be fed.

Inhofe’s position starkly contradicts the administration’s policy on the Ivory Coast, where Gbagbo has been widely accused of targeting civilians and opposition supporters during the four month stand-off. U.S., European, U.N., and African Union policy has called for the outgoing president to step down immediately. Today, the U.N. Security Council slapped tough sanctions on his regime, adding to existing American, European, and African sanctions already in place. 

So how did an Oklahoma senator come to support a man that most see as an obstacle to peace in the Ivory Coast?

Salon got the first bite out of this story, reporting that Inhofe and Gbagbo met through a Christian group known as the Fellowship.

The back story of that ‘friendship’ – one also shared by other prominent people in the Christian right – is here.

. . . .[but] one aspect of Gbagbo’s past — and present — has flown under the radar: his longtime ties to the Christian right in the United States, a movement in which he still finds at least some support.

That includes a U.S. senator and acquaintance of Gbagbo who declined to intervene in the crisis when asked by the State Department earlier this year, a former congressman who was hired by Gbagbo as a lobbyist, and a Christian right TV network that ran a fawning profile of Gbagbo, even as violence engulfed Ivory Coast.

Did you get that? A US Senator, when asked by his State Department, to lend his gravitas and personal connections to resolution of a violent dispute, refused. And he refused because he and the bad guy are Evangelical Christians together and sort of buddies, body count be damned. See?

Inhofe disgraces us all.

(A million people have already fled the country; the violence is expected to reach some sort of resolution very soon.)

Who they were. Who they became.

Barry Goldwater was a conservative, but he was no racist. George Wallace was surprisingly liberal, but as a son of the South, he was deeply racist. Bill Buckley was an elite New Englander and, unlike the culture that raised him, famously racist although he is said to have changed his position in later years.

Nixon was a moderate Republican who happened to also be a racist in spite of being from California. Politically, he used Southern racism to bring the old Dixiecrats into the Republican Party. And when he did that, he began the process that changed the character of that once grand old party.

None of those men would fit comfortably into the party of John Boehner or Sarah Palin. None of them was religious, although Nixon is said to have prayed a lot in the last days before Goldwater walked over from the Senate to tell him it was time to go. All of them would have been stunned to see the political and cultural power that’s been granted the Religious Right.

Steve Frazier recently penned an article in The Huffington Post about our history of “Mad Hatters” in American politics. In it he notes:

Goldwater, the Arizona senator and 1964 Republican candidate for president, an “insurgent”? Yes, if you keep in mind his condemnation of the too-liberal elite running the Republican Party, who, in his eyes, represented a clubby world of Ivy League bankers, corrupt politicians, media lords, and “one-worlders.” Or consider the way he flirted with the freakish John Birch Society (which called President Dwight Eisenhower a “dedicated, conscious agent of the Communist Party” and warned of a Red plot to weaken the minds of Americans by fluoridating the water supply). Or the Senator’s alarming readiness to threaten to push the nuclear button in defense of “freedom,” which could be thought of as the Cold War version of “Don’t Tread on Me.” Above all, Goldwater was the avatar of today’s politics of limited government. In his opposition to civil rights legislation, he might be called the original “tenther” — that is, a serial quoter of the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, which reserves for the states all powers not expressly granted to the Federal government, with which he justified hamstringing all efforts by Washington to rectify social or economic injustice. For Goldwater the outlawing of Jim Crow was an infringement on states’ rights. [MY NOTE: For Goldwater, state's rights was a core belief; his position didn't come out of racism.]

Wallace, Alabama governor and 1964 presidential candidate: Bellicose calls for law and order, states’ rights, and a muscular patriotism fueled the revanchist emotions that made Wallace into more than a regional figure. When he ran in the Democratic primaries in 1964 (with the support of the John Birch Society and the White Citizens Council), he won significant numbers of votes not only in the Deep South, but in states like Indiana, Wisconsin, and Maryland, a sign of the Southernization of American politics at a time when the spread of NASCAR, country music, and the blues were Southernizing its culture as well.

Both gentlemen fraternized with and sometimes embraced the fringe, and because of this were considered to be just too  radical. But today we have an entire element of the population celebrating ignorance and racism, and that element has found a home in the Republican party.

(That wonderful image came via a blog called The Book Value. I don’t know where he got it.)